Travels

What to see in Bath (video)

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If you know some English, you will wonder where the name of the city of Bath comes from. And, unlike other occasions where logic and result do not go hand in hand, you will be right if you think it comes from their bathrooms. The city grew around Roman baths and is today World Heritage Site For this and many other reasons.

Bath is in Somerset County, less than an hour's drive from Bristol Airport (the nearest international airport), and less than 200 km from central London.

And, very important, Bath is the city considered gateway to the Cotswolds, the authentic English countryside, from the south of that “Outstanding Natural Beauty Area” (Area of ​​Outstanding Natural Beauty).

But although Bath is the main access to stone villages and green fields of the Cotswolds, it is worth it as your own destination for a trip to the United Kingdom.

In addition to my partner David just writing about the Roman Baths of Bath, here you are a video about Bath at the end of this post, with our experience of a weekend in the city.

The places where we have eaten, the visits we have made and the areas through which we have moved are:

Parade Gardens

These gardens, bordered by the Avon River on one side and the historic center of Bath on the other, offer a green respite to the walker. In addition, they have been awarded several times for their seasonal floral carpets.

Pulteney Bridge

Completed in 1774, the Pulteney Bridge linked the city with the lands of the Pulteney family. A rare peculiarity is that it is one of the few bridges in the world (right now Ponte Vecchio in Florence comes to mind) whose sides are, in all its extension, permanently dedicated to shops and businesses.

Bath abbey

Bath Abbey is the third religious building that stands in the same location. The abandonment, which left it homeless, led to a national fundraiser promoted by Queen Elizabeth I in the sixteenth century to restore its splendor.

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